“Why do some children become sad, withdrawn, insecure, or angry, whereas others become happy, curious, affectionate, and self-confident?” developmental psychologist Edward Tronick, Ph.D. asked in a 1989 paper called “Emotions and Emotional Communication in Infants.” The answer lies in large part …

Rupture and Repair: Emotions, Attunement, and Attachment Read more »

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , ,

A neuropsychologist said of my oldest son: “His brain is not organized the way the world wants it to be, so he has problems functioning. But he doesn’t have behavior problems. His brain doesn’t do those.” My youngest son also …

My Son’s Brain in School Read more »

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , ,

Child trafficking: from victim to advocate In 2019, I found myself in front of an auditorium full of school staff members from 70 Colorado school districts, speaking at a training on how to identify child trafficking. Several years earlier, my …

Child Trafficking: How Teachers Can Help Read more »

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Having read and thoroughly enjoyed ATN board member Janyne McConnaughey’s first book, Brave, A Personal Story of Healing Childhood Trauma, reviewed here in June 2018, I had looked forward to immersing myself in her second, Jeannie’s Brave Childhood: Behavior and …

Jeannie’s Brave Childhood – The Author’s Story Read more »

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , ,

In the world of therapeutic parenting and developmental trauma, we hear a lot about shame. Professionals write lots of great articles about it. This is my perspective as a mom. When I first read about shame in our kids, I …

Shame: One Mom’s Thoughts Read more »

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

My son’s behavior has been improving. It’s really quite incredible when I think about the progress he has made in such a short amount of time. There has been no hitting. No biting. No long-lasting rages. Very little swearing. Still. When …

When My Son Cries for His Birth Mom Read more »

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

During a session with your therapist, she hands you a paper with three concentric circles drawn on it. They represent relative levels of trust in relationships. The central circle is who you trust the most. She asks you who you would put in that spot. You don’t answer. She pushes. You remain silent. Finally, she suggests your parents. You nod. You know that she needs you to nod.

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The morning after watching Instant Family, I sent this text: “as much as I liked it, it has messed with my head some. I’m a little stabby today.” Reading online reviews did not help with the stabbiness (let’s be honest–do …

Instant Family Read more »

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A new season is upon us. The glow from the dawn of the new year is on the wane. For some of us, it is in the company of the resolutions to which we swore our allegiance before we climbed …

Tis the Season of Everyday Celetastrophe Read more »

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Have you seen those funny memes that use photos to demonstrate the difference between how we might expect an activity or career to look and the reality? I have laughed at many. When we adopt, however, I think the contrast …

Expectation vs. Reality Read more »

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , ,